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How to watch Wigan Warriors vs. Penrith Panthers online for free

Nathan Cleary of the Panthers scores the match winning try

TL;DR: Stream Wigan Warriors vs. Penrith Panthers in the World Club Challenge for free on BBC iPlayer. Access this free streaming platform from anywhere in the world with ExpressVPN.


There is a lot of rugby taking place this weekend in the Six Nations, but fans of rugby league are not missing out. The World Club Challenge is arguably the most interesting matchup of the weekend, and you can watch every moment without spending anything.

If you want to watch Wigan Warriors vs. Penrith Panthers in the World Club Challenge for free from anywhere in the world, we have all the information you need.

What is the World Club Challenge?

The World Club Challenge brings together the winners of the Super League and NRL. This year that is Wigan Warriors and Penrith Panthers, with both sides looking to be crowned champions of world rugby league.

When is Wigan Warriors vs. Penrith Panthers?

Wigan Warriors vs. Penrith Panthers kicks off at 8 p.m. GMT on Feb. 24. This fixture takes place at the DW Stadium in Wigan.

How to watch Wigan Warriors vs. Penrith Panthers for free

The match between Wigan Warriors and Penrith Panthers will be broadcast live on BBC Two, with coverage starting from 7:30 p.m. GMT on Feb. 24. You can also live stream this fixture for free on BBC iPlayer.

BBC iPlayer is geo-restricted to the UK, but anyone can access this free streaming service with a VPN. These powerful tools can hide your real IP address (digital location) and connect you to a secure server in the UK, meaning you can access BBC iPlayer from anywhere in the world.

Access BBC iPlayer to stream the World Club Challenge by following these simple steps:

  1. Subscribe to a streaming-friendly VPN (like ExpressVPN)

  2. Download the app to your device of choice (the best VPNs have apps for Windows, Mac, iOS, Android, Linux, and more)

  3. Open up the app and connect to a server in the UK

  4. Visit BBC iPlayer

  5. Stream Wigan Warriors vs. Penrith Panthers for free from anywhere in the world


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The best VPNs for streaming are not free, but leading VPNs do tend to offer free-trial periods or money-back guarantees. By leveraging these offers, you can gain access to BBC iPlayer without committing with your cash. This is not a long-term solution, but it does give you time to watch the World Club Challenge before recovering your investment.

What is the best VPN for BBC iPlayer?

ExpressVPN is the best service for unblocking BBC iPlayer, for a number of reasons:

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A one-year subscription to ExpressVPN is on sale for £82.82 and includes an extra three months for free — 49% off for a limited time. This plan also includes a year of free unlimited cloud backup and a generous 30-day money-back guarantee.

Watch Wigan Warriors vs. Penrith Panthers for free from anywhere in the world with ExpressVPN.

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Julian Assange’s US extradition hearing wraps up in London, decision not expected until at least next month

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange’s hearing at the British High Court in London for his possible final appeal challenging his extradition to the U.S. concluded on Wednesday. The court is not expected to make a decision on the Australian publisher’s fate until at least next month.

The two-day appeal hearing before a panel of two judges wrapped up after U.S. lawyers delivered arguments, as they seek to have Assange, 52, sent to the U.S. to face espionage charges for publishing classified U.S. military documents 14 years ago.

Lawyer Clair Dobbin, representing the U.S. government, claimed the case is based on “law, on evidence” and “not political inspiration,” pushing back on accusations that Assange’s prosecution is politically motivated.

“Julian is a political prisoner, and he has to be released,” Assange’s wife, Stella, said in a speech outside the court.

UK HIGH COURT HEARS ARGUMENTS IN ASSANGE’S US EXTRADITION CASE WITHOUT HIM PRESENT DUE TO HEALTH REASONS

The judges overseeing the case, Victoria Sharp and Jeremy Johnson, said Wednesday they would take time to come to a verdict, and a ruling on Assange’s fate is not expected until March at the earliest.

While the hearing could be Assange’s final appeal attempting to block his extradition to the U.S., a full appeal hearing could come in the future if he wins in court this week. If he loses this appeal, Assange’s only remaining option would be at the European Court of Human Rights, but his supporters fear he could be flown to the U.S. before that happens because the British government has already signed an extradition order.

Dobbin purported that Assange put innocent lives at risk and went beyond journalism in his efforts to obtain and publish classified U.S. government documents. She claims Assange encouraged and helped U.S. Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning steal diplomatic cables and military files that WikiLeaks published, and that doing so jeopardized lives.

But there is no evidence that WikiLeaks put anyone in danger by publishing the documents. It is also a common practice among journalists to ask a source to provide more material.

Dobbin claimed that Assange damaged U.S. security and intelligence services and “created a grave and imminent risk” by publishing hundreds of thousands of documents. She said these risks could harm and lead to the arbitrary detention of innocent people, including many who lived in war zones or under repressive regimes.

She said Assange encouraging Manning and others to hack into government computers and steal material meant that the WikiLeaks founder was “going a very considerable way beyond” a journalist gathering information.

Assange was “not someone who has just set up an online box to which people can provide classified information,” she said. “The allegations are that he sought to encourage theft and hacking that would benefit WikiLeaks.”

Lawyers for Assange argued during day one of the hearing on Tuesday that U.S. authorities are seeking to punish him for WikiLeaks’ “exposure of criminality on the part of the U.S. government on an unprecedented scale,” including torture and killings.

If he is extradited to the U.S., lawyer Edward Fitzgerald warned, there is “a real risk he may suffer a flagrant denial of justice.”

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT URGES UK TO RELEASE ASSANGE AS POSSIBLE FINAL APPEAL CHALLENGING US EXTRADITION BEGINS

Dobbin said the First Amendment does not grant immunity to journalists who break the law and that media outlets that went through the process of redacting the documents before publishing them are not being prosecuted.

Journalists located outside of England and Wales, including from Fox News Digital, were denied access to observe the hearing remotely. Journalists who were permitted access, either remotely or in person, had trouble at times hearing lawyers during Wednesday’s arguments.

Should he be extradited to the U.S. after exhausting all his legal appeals, Assange would face trial in Alexandria, Virginia, and could be sentenced to up to 175 years in an American maximum-security prison. His supporters have long argued that he would not receive a fair trial if he is extradited.

“We’ve essentially heard nothing new from the U.S. government’s legal representation in this hearing,” international nonprofit Reporters Without Borders said in a statement Wednesday. “Rather than addressing the compelling new arguments made by Assange’s defence, they have doubled down on their longstanding claims that Assange’s actions do not qualify as journalistic activity and that he will be given a fair trial in the U.S.”

“The facts of the matter remain: the publication by WikiLeaks in 2010 of the leaked classified documents exposed information that was in the public interest and informed journalism around the world,” the statement continued. “The prosecutor and other US officials have stated that as a foreign national, Assange will not be afforded First Amendment protections. Combined with the fact that the Espionage Act has no public interest defence, that means he cannot get a fair trial.”

Assange was absent from court on Tuesday and Wednesday because of health issues. His family has raised concerns about his physical and mental health, with Stella Assange telling reporters that her husband’s life is at risk every day he remains in prison and that she believes he will die if he’s extradited to the U.S.

Earlier this month, U.N. Special Rapporteur on Torture, Alice Jill Edwards, called on the U.K. government to halt the possible extradition of Assange over concerns that he would be at risk of treatment amounting to torture or other forms of ill-treatment or punishment.

BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL RESOLUTION CALLS ON US OFFICIALS TO DROP CHARGES AGAINST ASSANGE

Last month, a group of Australian lawmakers wrote a letter to U.K. Home Secretary James Cleverly demanding Assange’s U.S. extradition be halted over concerns about his safety and well-being, urging the U.K. government to instead make an independent assessment of Assange’s risk of persecution.

Assange is facing 17 charges for allegedly receiving, possessing and communicating classified information to the public under the Espionage Act, and one charge alleging a conspiracy to commit computer intrusion.

The charges were brought by the Trump administration’s Justice Department over WikiLeaks’ 2010 publication of cables leaked by Manning detailing war crimes committed by the U.S. government in Iraq, Afghanistan and the Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, detention camp. The materials also exposed instances of the CIA engaging in torture and rendition.

WikiLeaks’ “Collateral Murder” video showing the U.S. military gunning down civilians in Iraq, including two Reuters journalists, was also published 14 years ago.

Assange has been held at London’s high-security Belmarsh Prison since he was removed from the Ecuadorian Embassy on April 11, 2019, for breaching bail conditions. He had sought asylum at the embassy since 2012 to avoid being sent to Sweden over allegations he raped two women because Sweden would not provide assurances it would protect him from extradition to the U.S. The investigations into the sexual assault allegations were eventually dropped.

AUSTRALIAN MPS PEN LETTER URGING UK GOVERNMENT TO STOP JULIAN ASSANGE’S US EXTRADITION, CITING HEALTH CONCERNS

A U.K. District Judge rejected the U.S. extradition request in 2021 on the grounds that Assange was likely to kill himself if he was held under harsh U.S. prison conditions. Higher courts later overturned that decision after receiving assurances from the U.S. about his treatment, and the British government signed an extradition order in June 2022.

One of Assange’s lawyers, Mark Summers, said Tuesday there was evidence showing that there had been a plan to kidnap or murder Assange while he was in the Ecuadorean Embassy and former President Trump had requested “detailed options” to kill him.

“Senior CIA officials requested plans, the president himself requested on being provided with options on how to do it and sketches were even drawn up,” Summers said.

The CIA under the Trump administration allegedly had plans to kill Assange over the publication of sensitive agency hacking tools known as “Vault 7,” which were leaked to WikiLeaks, Yahoo reported in 2021. The agency said the leak represented “the largest data loss in CIA history.”

The agency was accused of having discussions “at the highest levels” of the administration about plans to assassinate Assange in London and allegedly followed orders from then-CIA director Mike Pompeo to draw up kill “sketches” and “options.” The CIA also had advanced plans to kidnap and rendition Assange, and had made a political decision to charge him, according to the Yahoo report.

While he was in the embassy, the CIA was exposed for spying on Assange and his lawyers. A judge recently ruled that a lawsuit brought against the CIA for spying on his visitors can move forward.

“They’re putting Julian into the hands of the country and of the people who plotted his assassination,” Stella Assange said.

The Obama administration in 2013 decided not to indict Assange over WikiLeaks’ 2010 publication of classified cables because it would have had to also indict journalists from major news outlets who published the same materials, which has been described as “The New York Times problem.” Former President Obama also commuted Manning’s 35-year sentence for violations of the Espionage Act and other offenses to seven years in January 2017, and Manning, who had been imprisoned since 2010, was released later that year.

But the Justice Department under former President Trump later moved to indict Assange under the Espionage Act, and the Biden administration has continued to pursue his prosecution.

UK HIGH COURT SETS DATE FOR JULIAN ASSANGE’S FINAL APPEAL CHALLENGING US EXTRADITION

No publisher had been charged under the Espionage Act until Assange, and many press freedom groups have said his prosecution sets a dangerous precedent intended to criminalize journalism.

In 2022, the editors and publishers of U.S. and European outlets that worked with Assange on the publication of excerpts from the more than 250,000 documents he obtained in the Cablegate leak – The Guardian, The New York Times, Le Monde, Der Spiegel and El País – wrote an open letter calling for the U.S. to drop the charges against Assange.

An editor for The Guardian also published an editorial on Sunday saying that the outlet opposes Assange’s U.S. extradition because doing so would be a threat to both the WikiLeaks founder and journalism. 

There have also been multiple efforts made by lawmakers in the U.S. and Australia in the last year to demand Assange’s freedom, including a vote last week in which the Australian Parliament overwhelmingly supported calling on the U.S. and U.K. Governments to end Assange’s prosecution and a resolution introduced last month in the U.S. House calling for him to be released.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Save 80% on a lifetime subscription to this book summary app

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TL;DR: A lifetime subscription to Headway Premium is on sale for £47.59, saving you 80% on list price.


Failing to hit your reading goal this year? You’re not alone. There are likely thousands if not millions, of other bookworms out there who have a pile of titles gathering dust on their respective nightstands. If you don’t want a repeat of that this year, at least for the non-fiction books on your list, consider grabbing a premium subscription to Headway.

Headway is a top-rated app that doles out 15-minute audio summaries of non-fiction bestsellers, so you can amp up your skill set and receive actionable insights and tips without putting a damper on your busy schedule. A lifetime subscription normally goes for over £200, but for a limited time, you can get it for only £47.59.

An app designed with personal and professional growth in mind, Headway grants you unlimited access to an ever-expanding library of non-fiction titles, summarised into 15-minute chunks, both in text and audio formats. Over 1,500 summaries are currently available in-app, with 30 to 50 new ones added on a monthly basis, so you’ll never run out of valuable content to consume.

Whether you want to learn business strategies, health insights, and more, Headway can provide you with content that caters to your specific goals, allowing for more tailored learning. It even makes learning more fun and exciting by gamifying how you track your progress and collective achievements.

The audio versions of the summaries on the app are all narrated by professional voice actors, so you don’t have to worry about listening to AI-generated snippets. Just like podcasts, you can listen to them even during your daily commutes, workouts, or while you’re doing chores.

Learn something new anytime, anywhere. A lifetime subscription to Headway Premium is on sale for £47.59.


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Credit: Headway Premium

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UK High Court hears arguments in Assange’s US extradition case without him present due to health reasons

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange’s hearing at the British High Court in London for his possible final appeal challenging his extradition to the U.S. began on Tuesday while supporters of the Australian publisher held rallies around the world demanding he be released from prison.

The first day of the two-day hearing before a panel of two judges wrapped on Tuesday, and arguments will resume on Wednesday. This hearing could be Assange’s final appeal attempting to block his extradition to the U.S. to face espionage charges for publishing classified U.S. military documents, although a full appeal hearing could come in the future if he wins in court this week.

“Mr. Assange is being prosecuted for engaging in ordinary journalistic practices of obtaining and publishing classified information which is true and of public interest,” Assange’s lead lawyer, Edward Fitzgerald, told the court.

If he loses this appeal, Assange’s only remaining option would be at the European Court of Human Rights, and his wife, Stella, said his lawyers would apply to the European judges for an emergency injunction if necessary. She told reporters that her husband’s life is at risk every day he remains in prison and that she believes he will die if he’s extradited to the U.S.

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT URGES UK TO RELEASE ASSANGE AS POSSIBLE FINAL APPEAL CHALLENGING US EXTRADITION BEGINS

Should he be extradited to the U.S. after exhausting all his legal appeals, Assange would face trial in Alexandria, Virginia, and could be sentenced to up to 175 years in an American maximum-security prison.

Journalists located outside of England and Wales, including from Fox News Digital, were denied access to observe the hearing remotely.

Assange, 52, was absent from court on Tuesday because he was “not well,” Fitzgerald told the High Court. His family has expressed concern over his health and safety in the past, and those fears were emphasized again when the Australian journalist was not able to make it to the courtroom.

“I’m very concerned that Julian was not well enough to attend court today,” Assange’s brother, Gabriel Shipton, told Fox News Digital.

A U.K. District Judge rejected the U.S. extradition request in 2021 on the grounds that Assange was likely to kill himself if he was held under harsh U.S. prison conditions. Higher courts later overturned that decision after receiving assurances from the U.S. about his treatment, and the British government signed an extradition order in June 2022.

U.N. Special Rapporteur on Torture, Alice Jill Edwards, called on the U.K. government earlier this month to halt the possible extradition of Assange over concerns that he would be at risk of treatment amounting to torture or other forms of ill-treatment or punishment.

Last month, a group of Australian lawmakers wrote a letter to U.K. Home Secretary James Cleverly demanding Assange’s U.S. extradition be halted over concerns about his safety and well-being, urging the U.K. government to instead make an independent assessment of Assange’s risk of persecution.

Assange is facing 17 charges for allegedly receiving, possessing and communicating classified information to the public under the Espionage Act, and one charge alleging a conspiracy to commit computer intrusion.

The charges were brought by the Trump administration’s Justice Department over WikiLeaks’ 2010 publication of cables leaked by U.S. Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning detailing war crimes committed by the U.S. government in Iraq, Afghanistan and the Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, detention camp. The materials also exposed instances of the CIA engaging in torture and rendition.

AUSTRALIAN MPS PEN LETTER URGING UK GOVERNMENT TO STOP JULIAN ASSANGE’S US EXTRADITION, CITING HEALTH CONCERNS

WikiLeaks’ “Collateral Murder” video showing the U.S. military gunning down civilians in Iraq, including two Reuters journalists, was also published 14 years ago.

Assange has been held at London’s high-security Belmarsh Prison since he was removed from the Ecuadorian Embassy on April 11, 2019, for breaching bail conditions. He had sought asylum at the embassy since 2012 to avoid being sent to Sweden over allegations he raped two women because Sweden would not provide assurances it would protect him from extradition to the U.S. The investigations into the sexual assault allegations were eventually dropped.

Another one of Assange’s lawyers, Mark Summers, claimed there was evidence showing that there had been a “truly breathtaking plan” to kidnap or murder Assange while he was in the Ecuadorean Embassy and former President Trump had requested “detailed options” to kill him.

“Senior CIA officials requested plans, the president himself requested on being provided with options on how to do it and sketches were even drawn up,” Summers said.

The CIA under the Trump administration allegedly had plans to kill Assange over the publication of sensitive agency hacking tools known as “Vault 7,” which were leaked to WikiLeaks, Yahoo reported in 2021. The agency said the leak represented “the largest data loss in CIA history.”

The agency was accused of having discussions “at the highest levels” of the administration about plans to assassinate Assange in London and allegedly followed orders from then-CIA director Mike Pompeo to draw up kill “sketches” and “options.” The CIA also had advanced plans to kidnap and rendition Assange, and had made a political decision to charge him, according to the Yahoo report.

While he was in the embassy, the CIA was exposed for spying on Assange and his lawyers. A judge recently ruled that a lawsuit brought against the CIA for spying on his visitors can move forward.

“It was the first time that Julian’s lawyers were able to argue the political aspects of his prosecution in court, specifically the efforts of Mike Pompeo and his crusade against Julian,” Shipton told Fox News Digital of Tuesday’s hearing. “How he weaponized the DOJ to judicial kidnap Julian from the Ecuadorian Embassy, recorded meetings with his lawyer and even plotted to murder him.”

UK HIGH COURT SETS DATE FOR JULIAN ASSANGE’S FINAL APPEAL CHALLENGING US EXTRADITION

“Soon it will be up to the U.K. to decide whether they make a stand for free speech or they send Julian to the U.S.A. to face possible torture and death,” he continued.

U.S. lawyers said in their written submissions that their case was “consistently and repeatedly misrepresented” by Assange’s legal team. The U.S. lawyers said Assange was not being prosecuted for publication of the leaked materials, but for aiding and conspiring with Manning to unlawfully obtain them and subsequently disclosing names of sources and “putting those individuals at grave risk of harm.”

There is no evidence that WikiLeaks publishing the documents put anyone in danger.

State Department spokesperson Mathew Miller was pressed about Assange’s hearing at a briefing on Tuesday, and Miller declined to go into detail, but did claim that the WikiLeaks founder helped Manning hack into a government computer to steal information – an apparent reference to Assange’s indictment in which he is accused of asking Manning to provide more materials, which is common practice among journalists.

The Obama administration in 2013 decided not to indict Assange over WikiLeaks’ 2010 publication of classified cables because it would have had to also indict journalists from major news outlets who published the same materials, which has been described as “The New York Times problem.” Former President Obama also commuted Manning’s 35-year sentence for violations of the Espionage Act and other offenses to seven years in January 2017, and Manning, who had been imprisoned since 2010, was released later that year.

The Justice Department under former President Trump, however, later moved to indict Assange under the Espionage Act, and the Biden administration has continued to pursue his prosecution.

Fox News Digital reached out to the Justice Department about Tuesday’s hearing, but a spokesperson declined to comment.

Numerous rallies were held in cities around the world in which supporters called for Assange’s freedom, including in London, Berlin, Paris, Sydney and Washington, D.C.

In London, Stella Assange, who like her husband’s lawyers described the prosecution as politically motivated, compared the case to that of Alexei Navalny, the Russian opposition activist who died in prison on Friday while serving a 30-year sentence.

“Julian is a political prisoner and his life is at risk,” she told reporters outside the court in front of a large crowd of Assange’s supporters. “What happened to Navalny can happen to Julian.”

Fox News Digital was at the rally in Washington, where supporters praised Assange for revealing the truth about U.S. war crimes.

BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL RESOLUTION CALLS ON US OFFICIALS TO DROP CHARGES AGAINST ASSANGE

Medea Benjamin, co-founder of the anti-war group Code Pink, said, “Think about the hundreds of thousands of people who died because of U.S. lies, and yet, zero accountability, zero, no talk even of imprisoning [former President] George Bush or [former Secretary of State] Condoleezza Rice, or even Hillary Clinton, for her crimes as Secretary of State. Nothing, nothing at all.”

Benjamin continued: “Julian Assange, the one who wanted the world community to know about the war crimes that were being committed. Julian Assange, who understood how powerful truth can be. And yet here he is, languishing in prison. Here he is, potentially, very soon to be extradited to the United States.”

“This is a moment when we have to reflect on how wrong the world order is, when we have to reflect on how unjust it is that the truth tellers are the ones that are in prison, and how much we have to work for Julian Assange to never be extradited to the United States because we know he will never get a fair trial here in the United States,” she added. “And we know he has done nothing wrong. On the contrary, if anything, you should be awarded for having told the truth … And hopefully, we will be able to one day celebrate the release of Julian Assange and be able to, in person, give him our thanks for having exposed the war criminals and having told the American people exactly what it is your government has been doing.”

Author and journalist Esther Iverem said her “heart is broken in so many ways, as a journalist who believes in journalism, believes that journalism can make a difference when people hear the truth … I’m just here to say free Julian Assange. He’s a truth-teller.”

Filmmaker and journalist Eleanor Goldfield said that Assange is being prosecuted because “he opened governments, and he wouldn’t stop.” 

“Assange is one man, he is one man whose fate marks the fate of countless others, whose fate is inextricably linked to all those who tear at the facade of empire, who won’t sit down and shut up, even in the face of imprisonment,” she said in front of the Justice Department. “If Julian Assange is brought to this country and tried for espionage, the people in this building, on this street, in this city, in this empire, will officially have criminalized real journalism and truth-telling.”

Singer, political activist, and community organizer Luci Murphy led activists in song.

“Drop the charges, we shall not be moved!” Murphy sang. “Free Assange, we shall not be moved! Just like a tree that’s planted by the water, we shall not be moved.”

No publisher had been charged under the Espionage Act until Assange, and many press freedom groups have said his prosecution sets a dangerous precedent intended to criminalize journalism.

In 2022, the editors and publishers of U.S. and European outlets that worked with Assange on the publication of excerpts from the more than 250,000 documents he obtained in the Cablegate leak – The Guardian, The New York Times, Le Monde, Der Spiegel and El País – wrote an open letter calling for the U.S. to drop the charges against Assange.

An editor for The Guardian also published an editorial on Sunday saying that the outlet opposes Assange’s U.S. extradition because doing so would be a threat to both the WikiLeaks founder and journalism. 

There have also been multiple efforts made by lawmakers in the U.S. and Australia in the last year to demand Assange’s freedom, including a vote last week in which the Australian Parliament overwhelmingly supported calling on the U.S. and U.K. Governments to end Assange’s prosecution and a resolution introduced last month in the U.S. House calling for him to be released.

Reuters contributed to this report.

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Wyze security camera breach impacted over 900 times more people than originally thought

A surveillance camera from smart home company Wyze isolated on white background.

Remember that Wyze security camera breach a few days ago which showed 14 users images from inside other peoples’ homes? It turns out that the number of people affected was more like 13,000.

Wyze updated users on the Feb. 16 security breach via email, admitting that around 930 times more people were impacted by the incident than initially believed. The smart home company stated that approximately 13,000 users were shown thumbnail images from cameras belonging to other people, with 1,504 people actually tapping on them. This either enlarged the picture or showed the user a video from a stranger’s Wyze camera, private images that they should never have had access to.

According to the company, over 99.75 percent of Wyze’s users weren’t affected by the breach. Still, that’s around 0.25 percent of users whose privacy was violated — and 100 percent who should have renewed concerns about the security of their security cameras. 

The breach occurred after Wyze’s cameras went down for almost nine hours on Friday, an outage the company attributed to their partner Amazon Web Services. The devices were mistakenly connected to the wrong users when they came back online, thus allowing people to peek into strangers’ homes.

“The incident was caused by a third-party caching client library that was recently integrated into our system,” wrote Wyze in the emails, which it also shared on its official forum. “This client library received unprecedented load conditions caused by devices coming back online all at once. As a result of increased demand, it mixed up device ID and user ID mapping and connected some data to incorrect accounts.”

Users of Wyze’s security cameras are widely unimpressed with this explanation. Many took to social media to deride both the lapse in security and Wyze’s response, criticising the company for what they perceived as an attempt to lay blame on a third party instead of taking full responsibility.

“I really dislike it when a company tries to blame a “third party” for an oversight…” Redditor u/90TigerWW2K commented. “Dear Wyze, whether the error originated with AWS or some other third party, from the consumer’s perspective, YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR MANAGING YOUR VENDORS.” 

“I’m so disgusted and upset,” u/H3H3ather wrote. She was of the 0.25 percent of users impacted. “I’ve already deleted my account, but I’m feeling so violated.”

Wyze has attempted to reassure customers by adding more security to its service.

“To make sure this doesn’t happen again, we have added a new layer of verification before users are connected to Event Videos,” wrote Wyze. “We have also modified our system to bypass caching for checks on user-device relationships until we identify new client libraries that are thoroughly stress tested for extreme events like we experienced on Friday.”

Unfortunately, it may be too little too late for some users, especially considering that this is far from Wyze’s first security scandal. A similar incident in September previously allowed Wyze users to view feeds from other people’s cameras, the company stating at the time that it would “make efforts to ensure it doesn’t happen again.” In 2022, a report revealed that Wyze had been aware of a major security breach for three years, but failed to fully fix it, recall the affected cameras, or even inform its users. And in 2019, a massive data leak at Wyze exposed 2.4 million users’ personal data, including email addresses and health data.

Security cameras can be useful, and in many cases give users an extra sense of safety. Still, you should have a good long think about whether you actually need internet-connected cameras surveilling you at home. Or, at the very least, reassess where they’re positioned.

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Trans swimmer breaking women’s collegiate record is ‘taking away opportunities’ from biological females

Conservative radio host Jason Rants said Title IX means nothing after a transgender college athlete that obliterated the women’s record this past weekend during the New Jersey Athletic Conference.

“Now tell me again the strides women have made when society applauds a man for pushing us off our own podium,” guest-host Sandra Smith said on ‘The Faulkner Focus.

“I do think the Democrats are doing this to their own peril. I think when you look at poll after poll after poll, it’s pretty clear where the American people stand on this issue,” Rantz said. “We want a general sense of respect for folks who are transgender. I don’t think anyone is saying otherwise. Where we take a stand is where we pretend that there’s no differences whatsoever between men and women, and they very clearly are.”

VETERAN SPORTSCASTER BOB COSTAS KNOCKS TRANS ATHLETES IN WOMEN’S SPORTS: COMMON SENSE IS ‘NOT TRANSPHOBIC’

Ramapo College transgender student Meghan Cortez-Fields swam the 200-meter individual medley, finishing with a time of 2:08:20 — crushing the previous record for women in the event during the NCAA Division III sports conference.

“They pretend that there’s no differences whatsoever, and that is to the detriment of women who fought for generations just for some basic fairness, for equal access to sports and sports funding. And what we end up having is someone who is biologically male, taking away opportunities from biological females,” Rantz added. 

“Some people do see the path forward as having that separate entrance, that separate group. Some believe that shouldn’t even exist either. It should just be biological male, biological female,” Smith said. 

GOP SENATOR FUMES OVER ‘WACKO’ DEMOCRATS’ LACK OF ‘COMMON SENSE’ ON TRANS SPORTS: ‘GOING TO GET HURT’

“If you want to have competitions with transgender athletes, okay, create a third league where anyone can choose to join because at least then you are making the choice to compete if you’re biologically female against someone who is biologically male. Because if you’re a kid on any of these teams, even outside of this college, I imagine you’re feeling a lot of pressure not to say anything, because the second you step up, the second you say something, you’re immediately accused of transphobia when this is just about basic fairness,” Rantz responded.

Riley Gaines, a former competitive swimmer and outspoken women’s sports advocate, expressed in a statement on X, “Male swimmer from Ramapo College sets another school record in women’s event. Now tell me again the strides women have made when society applauds a man for pushing us off our own podium… Title IX literally means nothing at this point.”

Title IX, which was established in the Education Amendments of 1972, prohibits sex-based discrimination in any school or any education program funded by the federal government. 

Gaines, who is Outkick contributor and host of ‘Gaines for Girls,‘ also expressed her sentiment on Cortez-Fields’ first participation on the women’s swim team during the fall after transitioning. The Ramapo College athlete first smashed a previous record back in November for the 100-yard butterfly event during a Pennsylvania swim meet.

“Ramapo College swimmer in New Jersey goes from less than mediocre male swimmer to a record smasher competing against the women. Hmhm. Where have we seen this before,” Gaines stated.

‘The New York Post’ reported that Cortez-Fields’ follows the school’s regulations set forth by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and that Ramapo College defends the athlete’s participation on the women’s swim team.

In a statement to ‘The New York Post,’ Ramapo College said, “We have done everything the NCAA says needs to be done regarding trans athletes competing on the team. All of the steps were taken, and documentation was provided for approval of Meghan’s participation.”

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‘True Detective: Night Country’ finale: What actually happened to Navarro?

Kali Reis stands casually in a warm-lit room.

HBO’s True Detective: Night Country has run its chilling course, treading the line between cold, hard reality and the supernatural. And it’s here, clambering out of Alaska’s long night, that we have one lingering question about state trooper Evangeline Navarro (Kali Reis): What exactly went down out there on the ice?

In the eighth and last episode of the series, Navarro has a deeply spiritual experience outside the Tsalal Arctic Research Station, after she disappears into a storm. What actually happened to Navarro?

Let’s dig into it.

What happens at the end of True Detective: Night Country?

Jodie Foster and Kali Reis stand casually in a facility kitchen.


Credit: Michele K. Short / HBO

After finding out the truth about Annie K’s murder and interrogating their prime suspect, Raymond Clark (Owen McDonnell), Liz Danvers (Jodie Foster) and Navarro have to wait out the storm. There’s no power, no communications, and they can’t drive in the blizzard, so they build a fire in the loading bay to keep warm. Navarro seems unsettled.

“There is something out there, calling me,” Navarro tells Danvers as they sit around the fire. To demonstrate her connection to the spiritual world, Navarro reveals she’s seen visions of the older woman’s son, Holden, who died in a car accident years earlier. (In episode 3, when Navarro slips out on the ice, she has a vision of a rocky plateau from her time in the military. This is when she meets Holden, who is wear pyjamas and holding a plush polar bear. He whispers, “Tell my mommy.”). They’ve both been seeing those polar bears, real and plush, all through the series.

Danvers does not take this revelation well and leaves, but when she returns, her partner is nowhere to be seen. She tracks Navarro out onto the ice, where the trooper is walking with intention. As Danvers attempts to catch up to her, Navarro has a flashback to the same rocky terrain. Blood pours from her ear as a cacophony of screams builds, but Navarro seems to silence them by closing her eyes. She continues to walk, and a voice whispers, “Come, Evangeline.” 

We see Navarro’s hand outstretched, and a woman’s tattooed hand kindly reaches out toward her. The voice gives Navarro what she’s long yearned for, her spiritual Iñupiaq name: Siqiññaatchiaq.

Kali Reis sits in the dark on the ice, illuminated by torchlight.


Credit: Michele K. Short / HBO

Meanwhile, Danvers loses track of Navarro in the storm. Suddenly, she hears Holden calling for her through the wind, then she sees a vision of him trapped under the ice. Danvers starts chipping away at the ice and falls through, but Navarro drags her out of the water and saves her life by keeping her warm by the fire. Finally accepting the possibility of the beyond, Danvers asks Navarro what Holden said. “He says that he sees you,” Navarro says. Without any knowledge of their personal ritual, Navarro holds her hand up to Liz’s eye, just like Liz used to do with Holden, again connecting the pair with the one-eyed polar bear.

Later, after they figure out the truth of what happened to the scientists from Beatrice (L’xeis Diane Benson) and the Iñupiaq women of Ennis, time shifts slightly forward. Danvers is tight-lipped about where Navarro is and her cabin is empty, except for the plush polar bear and a video recording of Clark’s confession. Eddie Qavvik (Joel Montgrand) finds his SpongeBob toothbrush — the one Navarro borrowed — left outside his house. But where did she go?

Jodie Foster sits on a stripped bed holding a phone.


Credit: Michele K. Short / HBO

When the daylight returns, Navarro is seen walking out onto the ice. She’s not wearing a hat or gloves, but she seems calm and determined. We see Danvers and her daughter Leah (Isabella Star LaBlanc) driving, followed by a brief scene of Danvers inside a lakeside cabin; she puts down a crossword and goes to relax on the verandah. Navarro joins her on the balcony, though they don’t say anything to one another. 

The colder they get, the more visions they see.

When the power cuts out at the Tsalal station, so does the heating. As we’ve previously heard as an explanation for the horrified faces of the corpsicle, hypothermia can cause hallucinations. The colder Navarro and Danvers get, the more they hallucinate and experience strange things. And it’s not just Navarro this time. Danvers finds Navarro’s mother’s pendant in her hair while trying to get warm in one of the beds, and she sees a hubcap roll down the hallway, prompting a flashback to her son’s death in a car accident.

Navarro, whose connection to spirituality has meant more than a few visions for her during the series, is drawn out to the ice by voices. That’s where she ultimately has her rocky plateau vision.

What’s with Navarro’s different hat?

This might be a red herring or a continuity error or a “time is a flat circle” moment, but when Navarro is keeping Danvers warm to save her life, she’s wearing a different beanie than the one she was wearing out in the snow. That was a coral/orange, and this one is green. Of course, this could be explained away easily; perhaps Navarro donned a dry hat back in the station to keep warm. But this detail is noticeable enough to raise questions, or at least one big one.

Did Navarro die out on the ice?

Though it’s slightly ambiguous, I personally don’t think Navarro died. Sure, there’s a possibility she’s appearing to Danvers and the Iñupiaq women of Ennis, much like the ghost of Travis did to Rose Aguineau (Fiona Shaw), or like Annie’s spirit may have to the scientists out on the ice (if you believe that part of the tale). But in the finale, I think Navarro actually comes into her power out there.

Navarro herself has been plagued by visions and voices throughout the series, with each vision typically featuring a person pointing at her menacingly. In episode 4, she feels drawn by voices through the dredge to the Christmas tree, where the scream of her late sister Jules (Aka Niviâna) fills her ears, making them bleed. She’s told Danvers of a “curse” on the women of Ennis, and her intention of walking out on the ice early in the season. In episode 5, after the burial for her sister, Navarro finds herself straying too far on the frozen plateau; she ends up needing Rose’s help to get back safely. It’s like Navarro tells Danvers in the final episode, “There is something out there, calling me.”

Kali Reis sits by a Christmas tree in a dark dilapidated room.


Credit: Michele K. Short / HBO

However, two major things have happened: She solved Annie K’s case, and she received her Iñupiaq name, Siqiññaatchiaq. Beatrice tells Navarro it was also her grandmother’s name and that it means “the return of the sun after the long darkness.” That feels incredibly powerful after the trauma Navarro has gone through, especially with her sister’s death.

Navarro’s spiritual experience in the storm gives her the strength to both save Danvers and open her mind to the beyond, introduce herself anew to the Iñupiaq women of Ennis, resolve to keep Annie’s case closed, and finally move on from the town — away from her trauma and grief, and into the future. When Navarro and Danvers are drinking whiskey in the Tsalal station after the debacle in the storm, Navarro speaks about being wrong about “holding the hatch” and being terrified about who was trying to open it. In this moment, it feels like she’s found her inner strength, her spiritual name, and a sense of her future.

Kali Reis stands in a facility lab.


Credit: Michele K. Short / HBO

The cops interviewing Danvers say there have been reports of sightings of Navarro in the area, which means she’s not just a figment of her former boss’s imagination on the verandah. But when questioned about her whereabouts, Danvers is loyal and ambiguous.

“Let’s put it this way — I don’t think you’ll find Evangeline Navarro out there on the ice. This is Ennis: Nobody ever really leaves.”

Who you will find? The reborn Evangeline Siqiññaatchiaq Navarro, more powerful than ever.

True Detective is available to stream on Max.

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Haley says she has ‘one more fellow to catch up to’ as she makes final push ahead of South Carolina primary

GOP presidential candidate Nikki Haley said at a Fox News town hall on Sunday America needs a president who can serve eight years “fully working, fully disciplined and ready to get the job done” as she cites polling showing 70% of Americans do not want former President Trump or President Biden in office.

Haley’s town hall comes ahead of the Feb. 24 South Carolina primary, where she will face off against Trump.

Despite serving as Trump’s former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, the former South Carolina governor did not hold back on her attempts to convince the people of her state that she would make a better president than Trump.

“I look at where we started, there were 14 candidates in the race,” Haley said. “We’ve defeated a dozen of fellas. I just have one more fellow to catch up to. And through it all, there have been naysayers and that’s okay. I’m used to being an underdog.”

HALEY: CONGRESS IS ‘LYING TO THE AMERICAN PEOPLE’ BY TYING FOREIGN AID TO BORDER SECURITY

She said that going into Iowa, she polled at 2% and finished almost second at 20%, then in New Hampshire, she finished at 43% of the vote.

After the New Hampshire results came in, Haley said, Trump had “a temper tantrum,” adding that he was unhinged because he did not know she would get 43% of the vote.

“The night that we got 43% of the vote, President Trump literally became unhinged and went on a temper tantrum,” she said. “And all he did was talk about revenge. And then the next day he said, anybody who who supported me was barred permanently from MAGA.”

NATO CHIEF SAYS TRUMP CRITICISM ‘DOES UNDERMINE THE SECURITY OF ALL OF US’

Haley asked the crowd to think about Trump’s threat to bar people from MAGA, saying leading into an election, you try to bring people into your corner and not push them out.

Like many of her speeches, she also pointed to Trump’s push for the Republican National Committee to name him the presumptive nominee after two states voted.

“He pushed the RNC to name him the presumptive nominee, and he got pushback on that,” Haley said. “We don’t anoint kings in this country. We let the people vote.”

HALEY: TRUMP SHOULD NOT USE RNC AS ‘PIGGY BANK’ FOR LEGAL WOES

Rather than talk about the American people or issues like the $34 trillion in debt the country is facing, Haley accused Trump of talking about being a victim and getting his revenge.

“Trump never talked about the American people … All he did was talk about himself,” she said.

Haley also took digs at the Republican Party, placing the blame for the country’s $34 trillion debt not just on Biden, but also on Republicans, blaming Trump for putting the country into $8 trillion debt in just four years, and saying that less than 25% of the debt accumulated under Trump happened because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The first thing we have to understand is Republicans and Democrats put us into this mess, and we’ve got to call them both out for getting us into this mess,” Haley said. “Whether it was the spending, whether it’s the borrowing, whether it’s all of the things that they’ve done, we are $34 trillion in debt. We’re having to borrow money just to make our interest payments.”

“We’re paying more in interest payments than we are in our defense budget,” she continued. “You know who pays attention to that? Russia, China and Iran. So we’ve got to start pulling out of that. The way we do that is we start with our economy. We claw back $100 billion of unspent COVID dollars that are still sitting out there, instead of 87,000 IRS agents going after middle America. Go after the hundreds of billions of dollars of COVID fraud, one out of every $7 was spent fraudulently. If 8% of our budget is interest, quit borrowing. Cut up the credit cards.”

TRUMP BARRED FROM OPERATING BUSINESS, ORDERED TO PAY OVER $350 MILLION IN NY CIVIL FRAUD CASE

The former South Carolina governor also cited recent comments from Trump in which he said any NATO country that does not pull its weight would not be defended by the U.S. and that he would encourage Russian President Vladimir Putin to invade those countries.

“When you look at what Putin has done. We have to remember Russia is not our friend,” Haley said. “If Putin’s mouth is open, he is lying and we need to be aware of that. And I think that’s why it was so damaging when Trump said that he would choose Putin and actually encourage Putin to invade NATO allies instead of standing with our allies that stood with us at 9/11.”

“I will absolutely put the hammer on our NATO countries, that they do have to carry their weight,” she added. “But you do that behind closed doors. You do that and let them know that the United States is not going to carry the burden. But you don’t do it in the eyes of our enemies.”

She recently accused Trump of siding with a “thug” and dictator who arrests political opponents and American journalists and holds them hostage.

“[Putin] has made no bones about the fact that he wants to destroy America,” Haley said on Sunday. “And so the best thing we can do with Russia is let them know we’re on to them, and make sure that they know we’ll hold them to account on anything they do. And that includes hurting our allies.”

Haley also knocked Trump and Biden for their old age, pointing out that both men are around 80-years-old.

“About 70% of Americans right now say they don’t want Biden or Trump in this election,” she said. “The majority of Americans disapprove of Joe Biden. The majority of Americans disapprove of Donald Trump. Both of those men put us trillions of dollars in debt that our kids are never going to forgive us for. And are we really going to put all of our problems and issues in the hands of two 80-year-olds running for president? We need someone who can serve eight years fully working, fully disciplined and ready to get the job done. We can’t go and take the chance of doing this with two 80-year-olds.”

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Wordle today: Here’s the answer and hints for February 18

a phone displaying Wordle

Oh hey there! If you’re here, it must be time for Wordle. As always, we’re serving up our daily hints and tips to help you figure out today’s answer.

If you just want to be told today’s word, you can jump to the bottom of this article for Feb. 18’s Wordle solution revealed. But if you’d rather solve it yourself, keep reading for some clues, tips, and strategies to assist you.

Where did Wordle come from?

Originally created by engineer Josh Wardle as a gift for his partner, Wordle rapidly spread to become an international phenomenon, with thousands of people around the globe playing every day. Alternate Wordle versions created by fans also sprang up, including battle royale Squabble, music identification game Heardle, and variations like Dordle and Quordle that make you guess multiple words at once

Wordle eventually became so popular that it was purchased by the New York Times, and TikTok creators even livestream themselves playing.

Not the day you’re after? Here’s the solution to yesterday’s Wordle.

What’s the best Wordle starting word?

The best Wordle starting word is the one that speaks to you. But if you prefer to be strategic in your approach, we have a few ideas to help you pick a word that might help you find the solution faster. One tip is to select a word that includes at least two different vowels, plus some common consonants like S, T, R, or N.

What happened to the Wordle archive?

The entire archive of past Wordle puzzles used to be available for anyone to enjoy whenever they felt like it. Unfortunately, it has since been taken down, with the website’s creator stating it was done at the request of the New York Times.

Is Wordle getting harder?

It might feel like Wordle is getting harder, but it actually isn’t any more difficult than when it first began. You can turn on Wordle‘s Hard Mode if you’re after more of a challenge, though.

Here’s a subtle hint for today’s Wordle answer:

A long narrow mountaintop.

Does today’s Wordle answer have a double letter?

There are no letters that appear twice.

Today’s Wordle is a 5-letter word that starts with…

Today’s Wordle starts with the letter R.

What’s the answer to Wordle today?

Get your last guesses in now, because it’s your final chance to solve today’s Wordle before we reveal the solution.

Drumroll please!

The solution to Wordle #974 is…

RIDGE.

Don’t feel down if you didn’t manage to guess it this time. There will be a new Wordle for you to stretch your brain with tomorrow, and we’ll be back again to guide you with more helpful hints.

Reporting by Caitlin Welsh, Sam Haysom, Amanda Yeo, Shannon Connellan, Cecily Mauran, Mike Pearl, and Adam Rosenberg contributed to this article.

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‘Barbie’ star America Ferrara admits she ‘started weeping’ after meeting Leonardo DiCaprio for the first time

America Ferrara recalled bursting into tears after meeting Leonardo DiCaprio for the first time. 

The 39-year-old “Barbie” actress, who is among the nominees at the upcoming Academy Awards, noted that becoming starstruck by other celebrities can “sneak up on you” during a Friday appearance on “Late Night with Seth Meyers.”

“More often than not, it’s like someone you had a childhood connection to, right?” Ferrara said. “So it’s always very embarrassing.”

She continued, “I’m debating, like, ‘Do I even want to say this out loud? But, OK.’”

KALEY CUOCO WAS ‘SHAKING’ WHEN SHE MET GARTH BROOKS: A-LISTERS STARSTRUCK BY OTHER CELEBRITIES

Ferrara went on to recount meeting her teenage crush DiCaprio, now 49, after she won the best female actor in a comedy series award for her performance in “Ugly Betty” at the 2007 SAG Awards.

“I watched Titanic in the movie theaters seven times,” she recalled. “[I was] 13, 14 [years old], prime time to be in love with Leonardo DiCaprio, right?” 

“OK, so first time I went to the SAG Awards, and I had won for ‘Betty,’ I had been onstage and the whole thing,” Ferrera remembered. “I was feeling kind of like, ‘I belong here, this is cool.'”

“And then Leonardo DiCaprio was there, and I said ‘Hello’ to him, and I promptly departed him and went around the corner and just started weeping,” she said.

“And my husband, then-boyfriend, was with me and he was like, ‘I am so embarrassed right now.'”

Ferrara told Meyers that her husband Ryan Piers Williams, whom she married in 2011, urged her to “stop crying.”

“And I was like, ‘But it’s Leonardo!” she said. 

“I hope Leonardo DiCaprio never sees this,” Ferrara added.

“The good thing is he probably won’t,” Meyers joked.

Meyers, 50, then told Ferrara that he did the “same thing” when he met Julia Roberts for the first time. The comedian explained that the encounter happened backstage while he was hosting the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards in 2014.

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“I walked by her. She was like, ‘Hey, good job.’ I was like, ‘Oh, thanks, so nice to meet you.’ Walked around —  full cry,” he recalled. And my wife wasn’t with me, but I FaceTimed because I wanted her to see.”

During her appearance on “Late Night with Seth Meyers,” Ferrara shared that she was recently almost brought to tears after Tom Hanks complimented her on her performance in “Barbie.”

The “Superstore” alum said that she met Hanks, 67, at the Governors Awards on Jan. 9.

“Growing up, people were like, ‘Oh, who do you want to be? Like Salma Hayek, like J.Lo?’ I was like, ‘Tom Hanks,’ she remembered. “I wanted to be Tom Hanks. Like, that was my goal. And just a couple weeks ago, he came up to me and he said very nice things to me.”

“It was like I was in seven different timelines at the same time,” Ferrara said of her reaction to Hanks’ remarks. “I was like eight[years-old], I was ten, I was 14, I was 80 remembering this on my deathbed.”

“It was just so crazy,” she added. “I was like, ‘If you knew what was happening in my mind right now.’ But he was saying really nice things to me. And I was trying to remember every single thing he said. And at the same time, I was shaking and terrified that I was going to start crying in front of him.”

Ferrara was nominated for her first Oscar for her role as Gloria in last summer’s mega-hit “Barbie,” which earned a total of eight nominations. She will compete for the award against fellow nominees Jodie Foster, Emily Blunt, Danielle Brooks and Da’Vine Joy Randolph at the ceremony on March 10 at Los Angeles’ Dolby Theater.

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